Christmas Music

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Halasian
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Re: Christmas Music

Postby Halasian » Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:03 pm

Mediaeval Baebes - Of Kings and Angels Love their version of some fav Christmas songs, and some originals too! Merry Christmas!
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Re: Christmas Music

Postby resoundingjoy » Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:47 am

I heard "Frosty the Snowman" on the radio this afternoon while running errands and had to do a double take. Granted, trees and such have been in stores since September, but still!

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Re: Christmas Music

Postby shireling » Sun Nov 17, 2013 1:02 pm

All of the Mannheim Steamroller, the one Enya and the one StingChristmas CDs are in the car's player :D .

This afternoon, I'm dusting the living room and decorating. It's not much - a few more cardinals, switching out the candle holders I use all year round, a Merry Christmas tray (that I prop up on a book stand), and a white-washed Christmas pitcher, that I use as a vase for my holly. No tree anymore :( - simply can't manage it - but the place looks like I've done a whole lot :) .

It's a shorter run this year, what with Thanksgiving coming so late - hence the even earlier Christmas creep. For me, the season is from November 12th (the Birth of Baha'u'llah) to Epiphany (the 6th of January, with Visitation of the Magi) every year.
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Re: Christmas Music

Postby shireling » Fri Nov 22, 2013 4:00 pm

Tom Cotton posted this back in 2010, and I don't know how I missed it...

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"I would like an abundance of peace. I would like full vessels of charity. I would like rich treasures of mercy. I would like cheerfulness to preside over all." - St. Brigid of Kildare

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Re: Christmas Music

Postby shireling » Mon Nov 25, 2013 8:59 pm

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"I would like an abundance of peace. I would like full vessels of charity. I would like rich treasures of mercy. I would like cheerfulness to preside over all." - St. Brigid of Kildare

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Re: Christmas Music

Postby Padfoot » Thu Dec 05, 2013 7:26 am

Christmas Music in general (except being sung by Britney Spears or Mariah Carey :D ), and I have a tender spot for songs like "Fairytale of New York" , and "Grandma got run over by a reindeer". :D

Oh, and I try to avoid WHAM's "Last Christmas" , but that's almost impossible! :lol: :D
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Halasian
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Re: Christmas Music

Postby Halasian » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:48 am

One of my favorite Christmas songs... Father Christmas - Emerson Lake, & Palmer

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Re: Christmas Music

Postby TomCotton » Thu Dec 05, 2013 12:58 pm

That ELP one is very good.

I have liked Johnny Mathis "Do You Hear What I Hear" ever since I heard it in Gremlins.


The song blooms in my mind everytime I use the blender. :D
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Re: Christmas Music

Postby shireling » Thu Dec 05, 2013 9:06 pm

TomCotton wrote:That ELP one is very good.

:yes: Agree! This is the first time I'd ever heard it. :)
I have liked Johnny Mathis "Do You Hear What I Hear" ever since I heard it in Gremlins...The song blooms in my mind everytime I use the blender. :D

:lol:

This is mine. There are other videos others have put with the song, but I like this one, because it's of him, and what a character he could be. :)

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"I would like an abundance of peace. I would like full vessels of charity. I would like rich treasures of mercy. I would like cheerfulness to preside over all." - St. Brigid of Kildare

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Re: Christmas Music

Postby TomCotton » Thu Dec 05, 2013 11:17 pm

Yep, that is a good one too. :)
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Re: Christmas Music

Postby Padfoot » Fri Dec 06, 2013 10:53 am

:yes: :yes:
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Re: Christmas Music

Postby shireling » Sun Dec 08, 2013 12:43 am

Heard this live on A Prairie Home Companion, and fell right in love with it :)

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"I would like an abundance of peace. I would like full vessels of charity. I would like rich treasures of mercy. I would like cheerfulness to preside over all." - St. Brigid of Kildare

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Re: Christmas Music

Postby shireling » Thu Dec 19, 2013 1:04 am

Christmas songs - the oldest ones are the best

Monday 9th December 2013
Submitted by rsteadman

Carol singing became popular in the 19 century Christmas carols were mostly a Victorian tradition along with trees, crackers and cards. Eugene Byrne explains the why the popularity of Silent Night has never faded, why there’s always a place for Hark! The Herald Angels Sing, and why the British fondness of Good King Wenceslas has not yet subsided:

Although Christmas was celebrated in song in the Middle Ages, most carols in use now are less than 200 years old. Only a handful, such as I Saw Three Ships or the decidedly pagan-sounding The Holly and the Ivy, remind us of more ancient yuletides. Carols fell from favour in England after the Reformation because of their frivolity and were rarely sung in churches until the 1880s when EW  Benson, Bishop of Truro (later Archbishop of Canterbury) drew up the format for the Nine Lessons and Carols service, which has remained in use ever since.


Silent Night (1818)

Words: Josef Mohr
Music: Franz Xaver Gruber

Arguably the world’s most popular Christmas carol comes in several different translations from the German original. It started out as a poem by the Austrian Catholic priest Father Josef Mohr in 1816. Two years later, Mohr was curate at the parish church of St Nicola in Oberndorf when he asked the organist and local schoolteacher Franz Xaver Gruber to put music to his words.

An unreliable legend has it that the church organ had been damaged by mice, but whatever the reason, Gruber wrote it to be performed by two voices and guitar. It was first performed at midnight mass on Christmas Eve 1818, with Mohr and Gruber themselves taking the solo voice roles.

Its fame eventually spread (allegedly it has been translated into over 300 languages and dialects) and it famously played a key role in the unofficial truce in the trenches in 1914 because it was one of the only carols that both British and German soldiers knew.


Good King Wenceslas (1853 or earlier)

Words: John Mason Neale
Music: Traditional, Scandinavian

The Reverend Doctor Neale was a high Anglican whose career was blighted by suspicion that he was a crypto-Catholic, so as warden of Sackville College – an almshouse in East Grinstead – he had plenty of time for study and composition. Most authorities deride his words as “horrible”, “doggerel” or “meaningless”, but it has withstood the test of time. The tune came from a Scandinavian song that Neale found in a rare medieval book that had been sent to him by a friend who was British ambassador in Stockholm.

There really was a Wenceslas – Vaclav in Czech – although he was Duke of Bohemia, rather than a king. Wenceslas (907–935) was a pious Christian who was murdered by his pagan brother Boleslav; after his death a huge number of myths and stories gathered around him. Neale borrowed one legend to deliver a classically Victorian message about the importance of being both merry and charitable at Christmas. Neale also wrote two other Christmas favourites: O Come, O Come Emmanuel (1851) and Good Christian Men, Rejoice (1853).


Once in Royal David’s City (1849)

Words: Cecil Frances Humphreys Alexander
Music: HJ Gauntlett

Cecil Frances Humphreys was born in Dublin to a comfortable Anglican family. In 1848 she published Hymns for Little Children, a book of verse explaining the creed in simple and cheerful terms and which gave us three famous hymns. So to the question who made the world, the answer was All Things Bright and Beautiful. Children’s questions on the matter of death were answered with There is a Green Hill Far Away, while Once in Royal David’s City told them about where Jesus was born. The book was an instant hit and remained hugely popular throughout the 19th century.

The organist and composer Henry Gauntlett put music to it a year later and nowadays it traditionally opens the King’s College Cambridge Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols.
Cecil threw herself into working for the sick and poor, turning down many requests to write more verse. Much of the proceeds from Hymns for Little Children went to building the Derry and Raphoe Diocesan Institution for the Deaf and Dumb.


Hark! The Herald Angels Sing (1739 or earlier)

Words: Charles Wesley
Music: Felix Mendelssohn

Charles, the brother of Methodist founder John Wesley, penned as many as 9,000 hymns and poems, of which this is one of his best-known. It was said to be inspired by the sounds of the bells as he walked to church one Christmas morning and has been through several changes. It was originally entitled Hark How All the Welkin Rings – welkin being an old word meaning sky or heaven.

As with most of his hymns, Wesley did not stipulate which tune it should be sung to, except to say that it should be “solemn”. The modern version came about when organist William Hayman Cummings adopted it to a tune by German composer Felix Mendelssohn in the 1850s. Mendelssohn had stipulated that the music, which he had written to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the invention of the printing press and which he described as “soldier-like and buxom”, should never be used for religious purposes.


God rest you merry, Gentlemen
Origin unknown

This is thought to have originated in London in the 16th or 17th centuries before running to several different versions with different tunes all over England. The most familiar melody dates back to at least the 1650s when it appeared in a book of dancing tunes. It was certainly one of the Victorians’ favourites.

If you want to impress people with your knowledge (or pedantry), then point out to them that the comma is placed after the “merry” in the first line because the song is enjoining the gentlemen (possibly meaning the shepherds abiding in the fields) to be merry because of Christ’s birthday. It’s not telling “merry gentlemen” to rest!

- from History Extra.com
The official website of BBC History Magazine



We Three Kings, also known as We Three Kings of Orient Are or The Quest of the Magi
Words & Music by the Reverend John Henry Hopkins, Jr.

It is suggested to have been written in 1857, but did not appear in print until his Carols, Hymns and Song in 1863. John Henry Hopkins, Jr., then an ordained deacon in the Episcopal Church, was instrumental in organizing an elaborate holiday pageant (which featured this hymn) for the students of the General Theological Seminary in New York City in 1857 while serving as the seminary's music director. - Wikipedia

I once heard that this song was written in the style known, in order to give it an ancient air. Cannot remember the source of that to save my life, but it makes sense to me...
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"I would like an abundance of peace. I would like full vessels of charity. I would like rich treasures of mercy. I would like cheerfulness to preside over all." - St. Brigid of Kildare

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Re: Christmas Music

Postby Padfoot » Wed Dec 16, 2015 2:58 pm

Yes, it's that time of year again:

This is a favourite of mine. It's simply true.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tr1d0ivyTTk

And of course you know I love the quirky songs:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9jbdgZidu8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzV9DIL_vrM
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